Letter Unit Activities · Uncategorized

Letter G Preschool Unit

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OVERVIEW

For Letter G we followed some of The Peaceful Preschool curriculum for Good Night, Gorilla and Goodnight Moon. I then covered three classic stories: The Gingerbread Boy, Goldilocks and The Three Bears, and The Three Billy Goats Gruff.

FYI: I covered six classic stories in this blog post in more detail.

And, since goats are such a hit in our home we did just a couple other G is for Goat story extensions as well.

BIBLE FOCUS

IMG_9365 Good and upright is the Lord.” (Psalm 25:8)

We covered the theme of God’s Goodness mainly through the telling of Moses’s life: God takes care of us, God took care of baby Moses, God took care of the Israelites.

For our activity, we made a little boat for baby Moses out of tin foil, placed a toy baby in it, and then set it in water to float down a “river”.

You can see which stories we read from specific children’s bibles on my Bible Lessons by Letter Unit page.

Also a reminder I have Bible character peg dolls for sale in my Etsy shop which we always use for storytelling aids.

BOOKS

LEARNING ACTIVITES

I’m going to divide up the learning activities by book/theme for this post!

GOODNIGHT GORILLA
IMG_9364.jpg Good Night, Gorilla numeral learning and counting game.

Each kid got an empty small metal bucket and a 12-sided die. They roll the die, read the numeral (we helped the 2 year old) and then grab as many small zoo animals from the large basket and place them in their bucket. Whoever fills their bucket first, wins.

IMG_0016.jpg Stamp It! Write It! Poke It! via Simply Learning for letter G. This has now become a huge hit: Letter G was the second time we did this and now my kids are obsessed.

My kids actually use a plastic yarn needle for the Poke It! part because we don’t have jumbo tacks.

I also like these ink pads instead of the jumbo ink pads because with those my kids tend to mix the colors a ton.

We also have both uppercase and lowercase alphabet stamps

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Good Night, Gorilla story interaction & invitation to play. I’m sure you all know how awesome this book is — great for adding in some sequencing & color matching to storytelling. I love books like this where you can read it a billion times but something different will strike your kid on a new day.

We retold the story this time by setting up cages in play dough for all the animals and moved our zookeeper around the zoo, using the color-matched keys to unlock each animal as we went. I left all these materials out and the kids kept coming back to it, even if we didn’t have the play dough out they could still set up the cages!

Supplies:

  • 6 colors of play dough
  • 6 different keys with round key tags
  • 6 different cages made with a glue gun and colored craft sticks (FYI: I painted the orange sticks from this set pink, but you wouldn’t have to!)
  • Doll for the zookeeper
  • The gorilla, elephant, lion, and giraffe are from the Safari TOOB jungle set, the mouse is from the Safari TOOB pet set, the armadillo and hyena are from the Safari TOOB desert set (I just used the bobcat as a hyena–I know one is a cat and one is a dog but oh well)
  • Toy banana
  • Mini flashlight
  • We also have an Ernie doll which my sister-in-law gifted to use *because* she loves this book so much!
IMG_9489.jpg Good Night, Gorilla zoo animal habitat exploration using our Maps book. We found a country where many of our small zoo animals live, matched up the animals to the pictures in the book, and noted that these animals do not live in the wild near us.
IMG_9503.jpg Good Night, Gorilla scissor skills: make cages.
IMG_6453 (1).jpg Good Night, Gorilla zoo visit. We enjoyed a trip to our zoo for this unit and then created a large scale map of our own, placing our small zoo animal figurines on the map as we went.
IMG_9508.jpg Good Night, Gorilla themed poetry tea time! In honor of the baby armadillo we had milk instead of tea and in honor of the mouse: bananas.

Poems:

GOODNIGHT MOON
IMG_9671.jpg Goodnight Moon red balloon smashing fun.

We used this recipe to bake cotton balls to look like the red balloon, and then smashed them with a wood toy hammer and tore them apart. The kids could help in the whole process, so it was super fun to do together.

IMG_9558.jpg Since we were celebrating the moon in Goodnight Moon we also celebrated the sun! I decided to break out our sun art paper and do some letter review using natural materials to form letters and create letter prints.
IMG_9674.jpg Number formation — I used our sandpaper numeral cards and the Handwriting Without Tears number formation sheet (numbers are on page 2).
IMG_0015.jpg And, of course we did our Peaceful Preschool glitter glue letters.
IMG_9472.jpg What’s in the Box? Letter G item game. I got this idea from Games Children Sing & Play.

I hid several Letter G items in a box and said a little rhyme and asked the kids to guess what was in my hand as I grabbed one out. This could work for any Letter Unit!

Here is a box
Put on the lid
I wonder what 
Inside is hid?
Oooooohhhh
It's a goat 
Without a doubt
Open the box 
And let it out
Maaaaaa, Maaaaaa
THE GINGERBREAD BOY
IMG_9368 Obviously for this story extension we: baked a gingerbread boy! My kids helped with the whole baking process plus worked on forming the letter G (I gave them extra dough to just play with & smash and roll and cut — and they made a huge floury mess).

We enjoyed eating our gingerbread boy during our poetry tea time and read the poem “The Three Foxes” by A.A. Milne from When We Were Very Young.

*Bonus activity to burn off the sugar high from gingerbread: take turns pretending to be the gingerbread boy and chase each other around! I’m serious.

IMG_0514 In the story the old woman uses raisins to make the buttons for the gingerbread boy. We counted out some raisins into a numbered muffin tin with jumbo tweezers for a fine motor skill & simple counting exercise. Then… we snacked on some raisins!
IMG_9434.jpg As always, we do simple matching games and memory with our Letter Unit 3-Part Cards via Treehouse Schoolhouse
GOLDILOCKS
IMG_0010 We retold The Three Bears story using our Goldilocks peg dolls (available on my Etsy shop) and dollhouse furniture.
IMG_0009 BIG, MEDIUM, AND LITTLE sorting activity based off of The Three Bears. We had a huge line of items on the floor that I couldn’t capture in a picture well so I just set up this little sampling. The kids really had fun with this, hunting around toy bins.

The concept of big, medium, and little has really stuck with my 2 year old since doing this activity — she keeps bringing it up in a variety of circumstances!

IMG_0027 For our poetry tea time on the day we read The Three Bears we had big, medium, and little bowls of porridge (recipe via The Peaceful Preschool)! We also read the poems “A Good Little Girl” (A.A. Milne) and “A Good Boy” (Robert Louis Stevenson)
IMG_0012 We acted out The Three Bears story in a little play house in the woods we have on the camp property where we live. There’s three of us so we just took turns being Goldilocks (my 2 year old needs prompting for this but she’s all in).
THE THREE BILLY GOATS GRUFF

We read the following G is for Goat books:

IMG_0106 We read The Three Billy Goats Gruff and G is for Goat (the cutest little A-Z book ever).

We also made a G using grass my son cut (see below) — the kids applied glue to our Letter G printout (from The Peaceful Preschool) with a Q-tip first and then placed the grass on to the G.

We also adore the Heather Forest song version for The Three Billy Goats (from Sing Me Story)

Here are our goats: bigmiddlelittle … and we use a dinosaur for the troll!

IMG_0107 Small world sensory bin & invitation to play. I used rocks, blue-dyed rice for water, and grass we collected in the morning from the scissor skills activity below. We retold the story together as we act it out but also listen to the audiobook or the story song version.
IMG_0108 Cut some great green grass.

A free and zero-setup scissor skills activity! Seriously: this will occupy your scissor-loving kiddo forever.

IMG_0746 TRIP TRAP rhythm stick song: The Three Billy Goats (simplified version) via Jbrary by Dana and Lindsey. I don’t try to memorize these songs in advance when we do them: I just watch the video with my kids and we learn it together and repeat it.

We also don’t have real rhythm sticks: we just use unsharpened pencils that I got at the Target Dollar Spot.

IMG_8035 Act out the story on a bridge: There’s nothing more satisfying than stomping your feet across a bridge pretending to be a trip-trapping billy goat! Also I love attempting the troll voice.
IMG_0148 This week I found these simple & free printable letter mazes from brainymaze.com so we slipped them in our write and wipe pouches and worked on prewriting skills with dry erase markers.
 unnamed.jpgIMG_0443.jpgIMG_0378.jpg The Goat in the Rug was a surprising hit for our Letter G unit. It really is a lovely book, but my son got particularly fond of it so I decided to add in some fun learning extensions:

  • We compared types of goats using our Farm Anatomy book and reviewed photos of goats we took when we visited the Indiana State Fair earlier this year
  • We made a stick loom and did some weaving with an ornamental Green Grass (for letter G), pretending to be Glenmae from the story (and just enjoying the act of creating something beautiful)
  • We made shape patterns like the rug Glenmae makes in the story using a variety of pattern blocks.
 IMG_0146.jpg Beatrice’s Goat extension activities.

I’m so thankful for stories & picture books that can extend my children’s cultural horizons. We all enjoyed the book Beatrice’s Goat for Letter G week — it is the true story of a 9-year old girl living in Uganda whose life was changed when a generous donation through Heifer International gifted her family a goat named Mugisa.

It’s a beautiful story (and a lovely nonprofit organization), and we extended this by tracking the girl Daphine from Uganda through the This Is How We Do It book — Daphine, like Beatrice, also lives in a house made of mud with a steel roof, among banana groves and goats.

Earlier this week we also had the kids draw pictures for our Compassion sponsor who happens to live in Uganda as well! My son drew the Ugandan flag to send along to our friend.

Letter Unit Activities · Uncategorized

Letter E Preschool Unit

OVERVIEW

Our Letter E unit days were a bit scattered, mainly spending only 3 days on this letter. We had some family vacation planned in the middle, and when we returned I didn’t feel like it was needed to spend a whole other week on Letter E, so we went ahead and moved on to Letter F. Generally speaking, the reason I do 2 weeks per Letter Unit is to make sure we have enough time to cover the letter well and to not pressure myself to do too much.

BIBLE FOCUS

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E is for Earth: “The Earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it.” (Psalm 24:1).

We created the Seven Days of Creation out of play dough! We read the creation story out of The Jesus Storybook Bible first and then slowly went day by day and created the story out of play dough, counting and talking about the days of the week as we went. We also sang the “God Created” song (the printout I made is available here). The imagery of this story in The Jesus Storybook Bible is so beautiful & we loved singing our gratitude for all that God has made.

Materials:

  • Play dough (various colors)
  • Small figurines
  • Rubber stamps
  • Shape cutters
  • Creation Day Number Cards (The PDF I created is available here — I printed them on to blue cardstock)
  • Days of the Week (I used days from our velcro wall calendar)
  • “God Created” song (PDF here)
  • Letter E memory verse via Simply Learning

SONG

Do You Ears Hang Low? (Jame with Jamie How To Sing Classic Kids’ Songs)

This song was seriously such a hit, especially with my 2 year old — it has been 14 weeks since we learned this and she still sings it ALL. THE. TIME.

BOOKS

*From The Peaceful Preschool book list

LEARNING ACTIVITIES

Note that we do a number of phonics & letter formation activities with every Letter Unit and I don’t always snap a photo (thank God). I’ve also started finding ways to incorporate these activities throughout the day: not just as a part of school time in the morning. My son and I get some one-on-one time while my daughter naps so we may spend some time on letter activities then.

  • Salt tray
  • Glitter glue letters (via The Peaceful Preschool)
  • Forming letters with natural materials or play dough
  • Sandpaper card tracings
  • Dry erase write and wipe pouches
  • Chalkboard write and wipe
  • B is for Breakdancing Bear letter activities
  • Stamp it! Write it! Poke it! from Simply Learning
  • Letter Unit item basket (things that start with E)
  • Letter Unit 3-Part Cards

And, of course, my goal is to try as many of these as possible in our 2-week period but we certainly rarely do all of them!

Below are some of the specific Letter E activities we did:

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Elmer themed patchwork “E” using cut paint sample sheets I’ve used many times for scissor skills exercises.

Whenever we glue things to a large letter sheet I have my son spread the glue with a Q-tip first, holding it like he would a pencil.

IMG_6177.jpg Coloring large-scale Elmer. Another great idea from Simply Learning. I gave the kids the option of what media to use & they both chose crayons and Kwik Stix.
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E is for Elephant. E is for Ears. And E is for Elephant Ears!

My mother-in-law gave me this charming A to Z Alpha-Bakery children’s cookbook from 1987. There are some recipes in it which sound terrible to me, but a few gems like this one that I knew we’d have to try!

A great one for hands-on cooking: the kids could easily participate in the whole process.

IMG_6043.jpg This week we jumped on the “Stamp it! Write it! Poke it!” train via Simply Learning and did letter review for A through E.

My kids actually use a plastic yarn needle for the Poke It! part because we don’t have jumbo tacks.

I also like these ink pads instead of the jumbo ink pads because with those my kids tend to mix the colors a ton.

We also have both uppercase and lowercase alphabet stamps

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E is for Ear — Egg Sound Matching Game

The idea is to shake the eggs & try to find the matching pairs without peeking.

Materials:

  • 1 dozen plastic Easter eggs (I used 2 different colors but you could try to make them all the same color for more of a challenge, or do less eggs to make it a bit easier!)
  • A variety of materials for a variety of sounds. I used:
    • jingle bells
    • marbles
    • dry beans
    • pennies
    • cheerios
    • small rocks

Other common household items that could work: buttons, paper clips, popcorn kernels, rice, broken crayons, beads, etc…

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E is for Ear — Rhyming Basket Literacy Game

This is a super fun, engaging, and low-prep activity! Just dig around your toy bins to find rhyming pairs and you’re done! When we did this activity, I started with only 5 pairs at a time because I wasn’t sure how difficult this would be. That seemed to be a good start (10 would have been too difficult).

Here are the rhyming pairs I provided:
Car — Star
Shell — Bell
Sheep — Jeep
Dog — Frog
Bat — Cat
Bear — Chair
Fox- — Socks
Fire — Tire
Cone — Bone
Tree — Bee

IMG_6209.jpg We also did our Target Dollar Spot Rhyming Picture Cards (you use a clothespin to clip the correct rhyme). I can’t find these cards online but there’s this cool rhyme puzzle that is similar (ages 3+).

Finding rhyming pairs is a great listening exercise and also builds vocabulary.

IMG_6448.jpg E is for Ear — Listening Walk.

Often on our walks I play “quiet game” with my kids and ask them to pause and tell me what they hear. Well, for our listening walk we did that PLUS basically the inverse: what are things happening around us during our walk that we cannot hear? I actually stole this idea from Richard Louv’s The Last Child in the Woods — the game is called “The Sound of a Creature Not Stirring.” We made a list as we went.

Books:

IMG_6690.jpg E is for Egg! We read Rechenka’s Eggs and made “color volcanoes”: baking soda, food coloring drops, and vinegar. This is a repeat activity for us from Easter.

The kids helped place the Easter eggs in the carton, spoon in the baking soda, count & color match the food coloring drops, and poured their own vinegar. I cut the egg cartons in to the egg shape. And of course I jumped in with an eye dropper to play as well — we could do this all day!!

IMG_6290.jpg E is for Eating: 3-Part Card game.

Basically this is just a version of “I Spy” for feeding our little shark finger puppet. — “Shark is really hungry for … something oval … with a shell … the inside is yellow…” etc. Then my son named the item for shark, fed shark, and set it aside. Repeat.

FYI: half of these 3-Part Cards are ones I made to supplement the Treehouse Schoolhouse ones for Letter E. You can get that second set of Letter E 3-Part Cards here (PDF).

Letter Unit Activities · Uncategorized

Letter D Preschool Unit

LETTER D UNIT

OVERVIEW

For Letter D we covered The Peaceful Preschool activities plus some of my own ideas, mainly covering one week of D is for Duck and one week of D is for Dog. I moved the “Go, Dog, Go!” activities from The Peaceful Preschool curriculum from Letter G to Letter D because we were doing a lot of dog-related activities and I thought my kids would be up for that book.

BIBLE FOCUS

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The Golden Rule (via The Peaceful Preschool’s memory verse: “Do unto others…”)

We read from our Bible the story of the Good Samaritan, and talked about how Jesus helps us to be like the helper in the story. We made a list of 10 good deeds on little yellow hearts (which I later added to one sheet to display).

Then, we read the story A Hat for Mrs. Goldman because I thought it was a nice illustration of The Golden Rule: the girl Sophia in the story shows empathy & identifies a need (Mrs. Goldman needs a hat) but also acts on that empathic response to be generous with her talents & time (knitting a hat for Mrs. Goldman).

We then made golden pom poms to help remind us of The Golden Rule (DIY instructions are actually in the back of the book!!) My son also made the letter D with gold squeeze paint and little letters with gold glitter glue.

You can view all our A-Z Bible Lessons on this page.

D IS FOR DUCK

BOOKS:

*from The Peaceful Preschool book list

NOTE that I have a 2 year old and so I try to get some other books for her to enjoy. I think some of the books above I’d probably leave off my list if it was just my preschooler.

SONG:

This week we learned the song & hand motions for 5 Little Ducks (link is to Jam with Jamie’s How to Sing Classic Kids’ Songs)

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
IMG_5049.jpg Read Aloud + Storytelling Make Way for Ducklings

We read through the story several times. We counted out peanuts to feed the 10 ducks just like the story, and kept track of mom & dad as we read (looking at our Sibley bird postcard of a mallard duck to show the sexual dimorphism).

I created the ducks using 1.5″ wood craft coins.

IMG_5122.jpg Sink or Float activity in our “duck pond”:

  • Gather household items, natural materials, and in this case a few Letter-D items (dog, dolphin, dump truck, dinosaur).
  • Make 2 trays with SINK and FLOAT signs.
  • Demonstrate sink and float first.
  • Then, pick one item up & ask the kids to name it.
  • Ask the kids to predict whether the item will sink or float.
  • Throw it in the water and see if it sinks or floats
  • Have them fish it out with a net.
  • Have them sort it on to the correct tray.
  • Repeat.

This activity involves:

  • Object recognition
  • Large motor skills
  • Sorting
  • Decision making
  • Practical life skills
IMG_5113.jpg Rubber duck race game down a “river” by blowing through a straw (fine motor skills & hand-eye coordination)
IMG_5112.jpg Uppercase + lowercase letter matching game — put labelled rubber ducks in a “duck pond”, fish one out with a net, and match pairs as you go.

I did just letters A through F for this activity.

IMG_5115.jpg Duck Pond fun:

  • Follow The Leader (run around the duck pond, jump in, sit on the grass, splash the water, etc.)
  • Move a rubber duck with a spray bottle for a fine motor skills activity
IMG_5202.jpg D is for Duck out of play dough & Coreopsis flower petals (they looked like duck feet!)

Book: I Wish That I Had Duck Feet

I slip the D from The Peaceful Preschool in to a write and wipe pouch that way when we are done forming the letter with play dough we can use the printout for other activities.

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Invitation to build a duck pond. Use any natural materials and something for “water”

What we used:

  • Homemade blue play dough
  • Equisetum
  • Cattails
  • Rocks
  • Sticks
  • “Lily pads” — leaves cut with 1-inch circle punch
  • Animal figurines [ducks, fish, turtles, frogs]
  • Sorting tray

Books:

IMG_5215.jpg Clothespin and craft stick counting activity

Materials:

Involves:

  • Number recognition
  • Counting
  • Fine motor skills
  • One to one correspondence

Book: 10 Little Rubber Ducks

D IS FOR DOG

BOOKS

*from The Peaceful Preschool book list (note that Go, Dog, Go! is in the Letter G Unit)

LEARNING ACTIVITIES
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Harry the Dirty Dog painting activity (printable from Simply Learning)

The kids painted with Q-tips white and black paint on the opposite colored Harry.

(AND chalkboard write and wipe letter D practice)

IMG_5434.jpg Dog treat transfer & counting activity.

Materials:

  • Tray
  • Mini dog treats
  • Numbered muffin tin
  • Tweezers
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Dog care practical life skills.

  • We gave our dog a bath
  • Brushed him
  • Fed him (my 2 year old does this chore every day)
  • Walked him (also something we do every day)
  • Worked on dog tricks
IMG_5513.jpg We read aloud If You Give A Dog A Donut during breakfast. We ate donuts, poured apple juice (like in the story) with a pitcher, and worked on forming the letter D in a sugar & rainbow sprinkle writing tray.
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Play dough donut shop invitation to play! We made donuts & pretended to own a donut shop, each taking turns paying with pretend money and serving each other at the table.

Materials:

  • Various play dough colors cut into donut shapes using biscuit cutters
  • “Chocolate” frosting: brown oobleck (add cocoa powder to regular oobleck)
  • “Vanilla” frosting: white oobleck
  • Rainbow sprinkles
  • Play/pretend kitchen & money

What’s involved:

  • Practical life skills
  • Fine motor skills
  • Counting skills
  • Imaginative play
  • A huge (but worth it) mess
IMG_5620.jpg D is for Donut mixed media donut painting.

Book: Please, Mr. Panda!

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It’s a dog party!!

Connecting The Golden Rule to our D is for Dog week: doing a good deed for our dog and dog-owner friends.

So, together we made:

  • “donut” dog treats for each dog friend, and
  • puppy chow for the dog owners

I put the goodies in containers, labelled them for each dog + owner, added a little note, and then we took a walk to  hand deliver as many as we could.

IMG_5766.jpg Go, Dog, Go! fun:

  • Playing red light, green light with this little cardboard sign I made awhile ago (one side is red with “STOP” the other is green with “GO”)
  • Balloon toss
  • Red, yellow, green dot paint on to the letter D
IMG_5614.jpg Go, Dog, Go! color sorting and counting activity.
OTHER LETTER D LEARNING ACTIVITIES
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D is for Desert

We matched animal 3-Part Cards to small animal figurines.

Materials:

Book: Nature Anatomy

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D is for Desert small world sensory play with natural materials and our Safari LTD Desert Animals TOOB
IMG_5896.jpg Letter of the Week object game:

What’s Missing? — Lay out a few objects, identify each item, have your child close his/her eyes & remove one item, then have them open their eyes and identify what is missing. A really simple & engaging game we often play!

IMG_5613.jpg Games with our Letter D 3-Part Cards (via Treehouse Schoolhouse):

  • Memory — my preschooler’s favorite
  • Matching picture pairs — for my 2 year old
Letter Unit Activities · Uncategorized

Letter H Preschool Unit

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OVERVIEW

We did 4 school days for this unit over the course of 2 weeks, with some other fun learning activities mixed in. I centered each day around 4 books: Henny PennyThe Little Red HenThe Little House, and The Three Little Pigs. Three of those are classic stories, which I covered in this blog post in more detail.

I’m going to share about our Letter H unit divided up by the type of learning activity, as opposed to by book. I hope it makes sense!

BIBLE FOCUS

IMG_0444.jpg H is for Healing and Help. We read stories of Jesus healing people and talked about how our help comes from God and we can rest in him.

Reminder that these peg dolls are for sale on my Etsy shop!

For more detail on our Bible focus by Letter Unit please see our Bible A-Z stories page

BOOKS

IMG_1018 Books used for school days:

ALL of these have wonderful audiobook versions!

*Books from The Peaceful Preschool curriculum

Other H is for House books for just general reading and exploration:

SONG

We learned a new song & movement game called “The Tree Song” from our Games Children Sing and Play book. I picked this because you sing through each of the four seasons and we had been reading a lot of seasons books lately PLUS The Little House book (via The Peaceful Preschool curriculum) also celebrates the four seasons quite beautifully.

You can listen to the song here and also look up videos of “The Tree Song” on YouTube to copy the movements!

LEARNING ACTIVITES

I’m dividing up the learning activities in this post by category or type of activity.

INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
IMG_0497.jpg Act out the Henny Penny story in sequence. The repetition used in this story is so great for memory recall & story sequencing. I think it helps to have the animals or something similar for storytelling, BUT don’t spend lots of money for just one story: you could also print out some animal pictures and put them on popsicle sticks and hold them up as you tell the story. Or get crafty & create your own sock or finger puppets!

Here’s our Foxy LoxyHenny PennyCocky LockyDucky LuckyGoosey Loosey, and Turkey Lurkey. We already had these from our farm animal set.

IMG_0499.jpg What’s Missing? Henny Penny game: who did the fox eat? I set up this tunnel from our train track set, called it the fox’s cave, then had my kids close their eyes while I hid one of the birds in the cave and then asked them to open their eyes and tell me who the fox ate. A really simple setup for a game that enhances object + word identification and skill using visual clues for association & identification. You could even hide them in order that the animals appear in the story to enhance the recall of the plot sequencing.
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The Three Little Pigs is a perfect H is for House story! We read the book and How A House is Built by Gail Gibbons, and then I set up an invitation to build houses out of straw, sticks, and brick.

This also served as an invitation to retell the story as we went house by house and huffed and puffed to blow the houses down!

Supplies:

  • Three pigs & a wolf
  • Bricks: red stacking block pieces + red play dough
  • Sticks (stack them like Lincoln logs — I didn’t want to use actual Lincoln logs because I thought that would be too hard to blow down!)
  • Straw: I just cut up some ornamental grass plumes from our yard
IMG_0735.jpg Storytelling for The Little Red Hen.We read through the story together one time with no aids. Then, the second time through I brought all the storytelling aids out: hencatdog, & mouse, and then a divided tray with wheat seeds (it’s actually pearled barley), wheat plant (a grass plume from our yard), flour, and bread.

The other book pictured is is Alain Gree’s book The Farm which has this awesome page called “The story of bread” that helps reinforce the story of the little red hen making cake from wheat seeds.

We also love listening to and singing along with Heather Forest’s version of this tale (from Sing Me Story).

IMG_0733.jpg Sensory play and scooping & pouring.

After baking bread (see below) the kids just played with all the wheat seeds, plants, flour, bread, and bread dough. The kitchen floor was an insane mess when it was over, but they were so engaged and loving it. They were scooping and pouring and smashing to their hearts’ content all morning.

IMG_0737.jpg The kids made their own bread!! I use the master recipe from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes A Day — it’s literally impossible to get bad bread even if you have zero baking skills! It’s SO EASY. It’s a no-knead dough with only 4 ingredients and take two seconds to prep. The kids can mash the dough and form it in to ANY SHAPE and it will bake perfect and delicious.
IMG_0734.jpg Wheat learning: wheat seeds (it’s actually pearled barley), wheat plant (a grass plume from our yard), flour, and bread.

I gave my son a tray of the wheat seeds to practice forming the letter H. I love love love our tray for sensory letter writing — it’s deep so it doesn’t spill out easily and small so they form the letters in a reasonable size.

Book pictured: Food Anatomy (all of the bread pages in this book were also super fun to look at!)

PHONICS
IMG_1118.jpg Salt tray. We do this with every letter. I always demonstrate first with our sandpaper letters.
IMG_0804.jpg Form the letter H using sticks & bricks like you are constructing a house (paired with The Three Little Pigs)
IMG_1058.jpg 3-Part Card Game:

Harold the Helicopter needs a Letter H item landing pad!

Basically, I had one kid fly Harold and then I would describe his landing pad: “Harold needs to land on an animal, with feathers…” and so on. They say the name of what I’m guessing and land him and keep the card.

3-Part Cards via Treehouse Schoolhouse

IMG_0494.jpg Spell out Henny Penny book-related words using our movable alphabet. These are a free printable from my F is for Farm unit (you can get the full PDF here). We also looked at the hens, roosters, ducks, geese, and turkeys in our lovely Farm Anatomy book.
IMG_1201.jpg Stamp It! Write It! Poke It! via Simply Learning
COUNTING ACTIVITIES
IMG_1177.jpg House Poem (you can get this little card in PDF form here) — simply read the poem and have your child build their house with felt shapes. You could also cut construction paper or do cardboard if you have no felt!
IMG_1027.jpg I found free paint sample sheets at our hardware store and made this numeral-to-quantity matching game: matching the numeral to the number of windows on a house. You could also make this activity with construction paper or cardboard.
IMG_0493.jpg In the Henny Penny story an acorn falls from the tree to hit Henny Penny in the head. We counted out acorns on to our number cards. These number cards are from The Peaceful Preschool curriculum and we use them every week.
IMG_1188.jpg House building game — we rolled a 12-sided die and you had to add that number of blocks to your house (or tower).
FINE MOTOR SKILLS
IMG_0997.jpg H is for Hammering a House!

We pretended to be carpenters and hammered a house: I placed our Letter H printable from The Peaceful Preschool on to a foam board and then had the kids hammer golf tees in to a letter H.

Books:

IMG_0679.jpg Blow pigs off the table with a straw (we used pigs from our Pass the Pigs game since they are little and light).

Paired with The Three Little Pigs

Blowing through a straw helps strengthen the mouth muscles needed for proper speech. Plus, it’s fun!

IMG_0513.jpg Practical life & fine motor skill activity: dust pan to clean up acorns.

In the Henny Penny story an acorn falls from the tree to hit Henny Penny in the head.

IMG_0523 In the Henny Penny story an acorn falls from the tree to hit Henny Penny in the head.

We threaded oak leaves (oak trees make acorns!) in to our stick loom for a fun fall-themed nature study + fine motor skill handcraft activity. We had been using our stick looms a lot so it was fun to loosely connect it to Henny Penny on the day we read it.

ART SKILLS
IMG_1024.jpg The Little House watercolor scene with The Peaceful Preschool.

I pointed out to my son that this page in The Little House is mostly black & since he LOVES painting with black he asked to try painting it. He doesn’t really do this much (paint a specific scene from a book), but was so happy to try.

IMG_1029.jpg We built houses in a wide variety of ways all week: Duplos, blocks, tangrams, Lincoln logs, etc.
NATURE STUDY & PLAY
DSC_0065.jpg We have a little play house on the camp property where we live and did a lot of role playing here (The Three Little Pigs was a favorite) this week.
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H is for Home nature study:

We explored a cave (bat home) at an Indiana State Park near us.

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H is for Home nature study: beaver hut & dam.

We have active beavers on our lake and decided to take an evening family canoe ride to get up close to the dam and inspect it further. My husband got out of the canoe for a bit with each kid so they could go see the pond behind the dam. Our little stuffed animal beaver even hitched a ride on the canoe with us (sitting next to me in this shot)!

IMG_1145.jpg At home we read A House in the Woods a billion times and my son constructed his own beaver dam & hut in a blue rice (“water”) sensory bin. We also used Nature Anatomy (pages 150-151 for beavers).
LETTER REVIEW

I’ve been trying to incorporate more letter review on our “off” days: it’s really easy to do in a low-prep way where we can still enjoy some learning without it feel like it is a school day.

IMG_1119.jpg Item + Letter matching review while reviewing letter sounds.

We had multiple items for each letter available in a basket and I asked my son to match the item to the beginning letter while we went through the sounds each letter makes.

IMG_1055.jpg Uppercase & lowercase letter matching with paint sample sheets that look like houses.
IMG_1069.jpg Puzzles for letter review: I grabbed this alphabet sequence puzzle set from the Target Dollar Spot earlier this summer and it’s been a good one for letter review!

Learning Resources has this similar puzzle.

POETRY TEA TIME

IMG_0759.jpg For poetry tea time on this Little Red Hen day, we read two fun hen poems: “The Little Black Hen” from Now We Are Six and “The Clucking Hen” from A Child’s Book of Poems. And, we had some snacks-that-come-from wheat!

I do not always make poetry tea time themed with our school days but it’s fun when it works out! Most days lately we read Shel Silverstein!

Letter Unit Activities · Uncategorized

Letter C Preschool Unit

ABF732B8-503F-4D5D-9C33-CECC1CD6840D
OVERVIEW

We covered a variety of things for one week of Letter C doing The Peaceful Preschool curriculum and some other activities. Caps For Sale was probably the most impressionable and memorable: what a fantastic story!

C IS FOR CAMPING
E29521C0-CEDD-4EAC-8076-7E41D5174FB3.jpg We also spent an entire week on C is for Camping — you can view that entire unit on a separate post (COMING SOON)
BIBLE FOCUS
IMG_3477.jpg The Peaceful Preschool memory verse used “children” for letter C, so I went with that for our Bible focus. We also had Thoughts to Make Your Heart Sing from the library this week to peruse and I found a fitting page in there.

“God says ‘I love you – Just Because!'” We read several stories in which Jesus interacted with children. There’s several good ones from The Jesus Storybook Bible — “How to pray” (featured in the photo), “The friend of little children”, and stories from our other children’s Bibles as well: Jesus heals Jairus’ daughter, and Jesus feeds the five thousand (the young boy supplies the bread and fish).

You can view more details about our A-Z Bible focus on this page.

BOOKS

*Books from The Peaceful Preschool curriculum

We also enjoyed the audiobooks for Caps For Sale and Corduroy!

LEARNING ACTIVITIES

Note that some things we do I don’t capture in a photo, like most of our letter formation activities: glitter glue letters (or sandpaper letters), write & wipe chalkboard, write & wipe dry erase, and salt tray.

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Reading and acting out Caps For Sale!

I painted a peddler peg doll and used wood craft buttons for “caps” in order to reenact the story and for a fine motor skill + counting + color sorting activity.

IMG_3364.jpg Acting out Caps For Sale Part 2: use a Barrel of Monkeys to hang some crazy monkeys on a tree just like the story (great for fine motor skills, counting, & story reenactment). So fun!!

I stuck sticks in some play dough in the barrel so the sticks wouldn’t move.

IMG_3448.jpg Forming letter C with play dough and our wood “caps” — I like the added effect of not just forming the letter out of play dough but one-by-one adding some small item to it (could be bottle caps or beads or coins).
IMG_3335.jpg Caps for Sale story reenactment with the hats: obviously we did this!
IMG_3455.jpg Coin sorting & counting tray: “Fifty cents a cap!”. When I did this with the kids the first time we counted out 50 cents in different ways and pretended to sell each other some caps (see above). I also took the time to name each coin for them while we sorted, which never occurred to me to do before for some reason. I left this on our learning shelf all week.
IMG_3679.jpg Corduroy button sorting (large, medium, small). My son (preschooler) wanted nothing to do with this but my 2 year old did it. I sat with her the first time and named each size over and over. Then I let her try it alone. It’s great for sorting decision-making but also fine motor skills.
IMG_3668.jpg We did some embroidery hoop hand sewing today to pretended to be the little girl in Corduroy. I don’t have any giant plastic buttons so I just let them hand-stitch freely to their heart’s content while we listened to the audio of the Corduroy story.
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C is for Caps, Corduroy, and Clothing! . . .

These are my DIY Montessori Dressing Frames.

I just took old soon-to-be-given-away or beyond-hope clothing of my kids, placed an embroidery hoop around the part I wanted, and then cut up the clothing around it.

There’s velcro, a zipper, snaps, buttons (small ones from a shirt and big ones from a jacket), a buckle, and a shoelace.

I will say that while my 2 year old loves these & they keep her occupied for awhile, my 3 year old has very little interest. He also can be quite resistant to getting dressed independently anyway. My 2 year old, on the other hand, can be heard yelling “I want to do it all by myself!” all day.

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C is for Clothing:

Each kid has one drawer with clothing labels (I made these labels with photos of their actual clothing). The idea is that their clothing is 100% accessible to them and that they have limited choices. I keep the excess and off-season stuff up higher in the dresser or in a closet.

We also worked on clothes sorting & matching with our actual clothes and printed cards.

Lastly, we also did a sock pairing matching: I literally just threw every sock they have in a bin and asked them to find all the pairs. Extra enticement for learning & playing with clothes: run them through the dryer for a few minutes so they are warm & cozy!

IMG_3585.jpg “She gives me cream with all her might…” (The Cow by Robert Louis Stevenson).

We read this poem and then made whipped cream (recipe via The Peaceful Preschool) by shaking a jar filled with cream & a couple of marbles for some (intense) large motor skills, practical life skills, and for a yummy treat!

IMG_3451.jpg “She walks along the meadow grass / and eats the meadow flowers” (The Cow by Robert Louis Stevenson).

We picked some flowers today and the kids arranged them in a vase together. We left out a couple for them to pick the petals apart, count the petals, and to compare sizes & colors.

IMG_3539.jpg We picked some clover in our yard to form in to a C
 

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Chicka Chicka Boom Boom & movable alphabet fun!

I made a simple coconut tree out of construction paper.

What a great book for just some open-ended alphabet exploration (and identifying upper and lower case letters).

IMG_3547.jpg For letter review this week I took all our Letter A, B, and C 3-Part cards together and had my son separate them in to separate caps.
IMG_3712.jpg C is for Cherry Chocolate Cupcakes!

There are SO MANY Letter C sweet treats to choose from: chocolate cupcakes, chocolate cake, chocolate chip cookies, coconut cookies, carrot cake, etc. BUT … we got ABC Dream from the library this week and on the C page there’s a cherry chocolate cupcake and my first thought was: “Well that’s the best idea EVER!” …

So, we made chocolate cupcakes with cherry flavored frosting. The kids helped in the kitchen and ate more frosting than was necessary. If you’re interested, I typed the recipe out & it’s in PDF form here.

IMG_3733.jpg Counting some cats & cupcakes after reading If You Give A Cat A Cupcake

This is not from The Peaceful Preschool curriculum, but I couldn’t pass up doing this book & some cat-related. I’ve had these Charley Harper cat stickers since Christmas and finally found a good use for them!

Basically for this I presented a bowl of cats and bowl of cupcakes and then asked them to count out ____ cats and ____ cupcakes, and then had them count the total number of cats and cupcakes.

When we were finished my 2 year old got her own version of a fine motor skill activity: she peeled all the cupcake stickers off the wood craft coins for me!

IMG_3844.jpg C is for Cat craft from Simply Learning. I printed the cat C on to color cardstock (their choice), and then they put glue on the C and placed color pom poms around it. I added the cutout ears to make a cat!

This ended up being a joint endeavor because my son lost interest after about half the C — then little sister came along to happily finish!

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C is for Cat’s Colors

Color sorting items I have: these peg dolls, wood craft acorns, 1.5″ wood craft coins, tree branch discs (I cut these from a sassafras branch with a coping saw), and cards that I made with the name of each color (our color sorting tray has 12 colors).

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C is for Chalk. We made chalk paint with the beat-up leftovers of our existing chalk pile since we got a brand new box of chalk this week.

We color sorted all the pieces & then we poured each set in a separate plastic bag. I let both kids hammer it to oblivion with their toy wood hammers (I helped with a legit hammer). Then, we added the crushed pieces back into the bowls, added water, and voilà: chalk paint!

IMG_3959.jpg Just a reminder that I use the Jolly Phonics Actions for going through letter sounds for each letter.

For example:

  • ck: raise hands and snap fingers as if playing castanets saying ck, ck, ck
  • ch: move arms at sides as if you are a train, saying ch, ch, ch
  • (Obviously Letter C also sometimes makes the “s” sounds but we didn’t have any objects or cards to go with that for this example)

You can also find videos on YouTube of kids doing the sounds & actions!

Books · Letter Unit Activities · Uncategorized

Classic Story Extensions for Preschool

classic stories
OVERVIEW

“Fairy tales don’t condone poor behavior; they simply relate what occurs. Children learn very early that there are good people, bad people, kind people, cruel people, and assortments of behavior in between. And children have room in their lives for all sorts of miracles…. an active imagination [is] a token of the liberty of childhood.” (Gladys Hunt, Honey For A Child’s Heart)

Over the past 2 weeks it worked out that we could fit 6 classic stories into our regularly-scheduled Letter Unit activities: 3 stories fit in with letter G (Gingerbread, Goat, Goldilocks) and 3 stories fit for letter H (Hens and Houses). This post summarizes all that we did for each story.

This is not meant to serve as a perfectly planned-out curriculum: it’s simply a picture of what we actually did. I hope there’s something useful here to you!

I adore Paul Galdone’s versions of the following classic stories — both for the storytelling and the illustrations:

Gladys Hunt notes: “Children have been enjoying Galdone’s renditions for generations” (Honey for a Child’s Heart), and I couldn’t agree more. The audiobook versions for each of these are also excellent and worth finding! Galdone has a number of other classic stories beyond what I chose, but I stuck to just these six because: (1) they fit in with our Letter G and Letter H units, and (2) these are specifically mentioned in Honey for a Child’s Heart.

We also love the Heather Forest song versions of several of these stories on her Sing Me A Story album:

  • The Little Red Hen
  • The Three Billy Goats Gruff
  • Mr. Bun (similar to The Gingerbread Boy)

Honorable mention to Jan Brett’s version of Goldilocks and the Three Bears! A gorgeous book.

Alright, here we go…

THE GINGERBREAD BOY

IMG_9368.jpg Obviously: Bake a gingerbread boy! My kids helped with the whole baking process plus worked on forming the letter G (I gave them extra dough to just play with & smash and roll and cut — and they made a huge floury mess).

We enjoyed eating our gingerbread boy during our poetry tea time and read the poem “The Three Foxes” from When We Were Very Young.

*Bonus activity to burn off the sugar high from gingerbread: take turns pretending to be the gingerbread boy and chase each other around! I’m serious.

 IMG_0514.jpg In the story the old woman uses raisins to make the buttons for the gingerbread boy. We counted out some raisins into a numbered muffin tin with jumbo tweezers for a fine motor skill & simple counting exercise. Then… we snacked on some raisins!

THE THREE BEARS

IMG_0010.jpg We retold  the story using our Goldilocks peg dolls (available on my Etsy shop) [note: currently sold out but I’m making more] and dollhouse furniture.
IMG_0009.jpg Big, medium, little sorting activity. We had a huge line of items on the floor that I couldn’t capture in a picture well so I just set up this little sampling. The kids really had fun with this, hunting around toy bins.
IMG_0027.jpg For our poetry tea time we had big, medium, and little bowls of porridge (recipe via The Peaceful Preschool)!

We also read the poems “A Good Little Girl” (A.A. Milne) and “A Good Boy” (Robert Louis Stevenson)

IMG_0012.jpg We acted out the story in a little play house in the woods we have on the camp property where we live. There’s three of us so we just took turns being Goldilocks (my 2 year old needs prompting for this but she’s all in).

THE THREE BILLY GOATS GRUFF

IMG_0106.jpg We read The Three Billy Goats Gruff and G is for Goat (the cutest little A-Z book ever).

We also made a G using grass my son cut (see below) — the kids applied glue to our Letter G printout (from The Peaceful Preschool) with a Q-tip first and then placed the grass.

We also adore the Heather Forest song version for The Three Billy Goats (from Sing Me Story)

Here are our goats: big, middle, little … and we use a dinosaur for the troll!

IMG_0746.jpg TRIP TRAP rhythm stick song: The Three Billy Goats (simplified version) via Jbrary by Dana and Lindsey. I don’t try to memorize these songs in advance when we do them: I just watch the video with my kids and we learn it together and repeat it. We also don’t have real rhythm sticks: we just use unsharpened pencils that I got at the Target Dollar Spot. We also used the rhythm sticks to make the trip-trapping rhythm on our wood bridge.
IMG_0108.jpg Cut some great green grass. A free and zero-setup scissor skills activity! Seriously: this will occupy your scissor-loving kiddo forever.
IMG_0107.jpg Small world sensory bin & invitation to play. I used rocks, blue-dyed rice for water, and grass we collected in the morning from the scissor activity above. We retell the story together but also listen to the audiobook or the story song version.
IMG_8035.jpg Act out the story on a bridge: There’s nothing more satisfying than stomping your feet across a bridge pretending to be a trip-trapping billy goat!

HENNY PENNY

IMG_0497.jpg Act out the Henny Penny story in sequence. The repetition used in this story is so great for memory recall & story sequencing. I think it helps to have the animals for storytelling, BUT don’t spend money for just one story: you could also print out some animal pictures and put them on popsicle sticks and hold them up as you tell the story.

Here’s our Foxy Loxy, Henny Penny, Cocky Locky, Ducky Lucky, Goosey Loosey, and Turkey Lurkey.

IMG_0499.jpg What’s Missing?” game: who did the fox eat? I set up this tunnel from our train track set, called it the fox’s cave, then had my kids close their eyes while I hid one of the birds in the cave and then asked them to open their eyes and tell me who the fox ate. A really simple setup for a game that enhances object + word identification and skill using visual clues for association & identification. You could even hide them in order that the animals appear in the story to enhance the recall of the plot sequencing
IMG_0494.jpg Spell out book-related words using our movable alphabet. These are a free printable from my F is for Farm unit (you can get the full PDF here). We also looked at the hens, roosters, ducks, geese, and turkeys in our lovely Farm Anatomy book.
IMG_0493.jpg In the story an acorn falls from the tree to hit Henny Penny in the head. We counted out acorns on to our number cards. These number cards are from The Peaceful Preschool curriculum and we use them every week.
IMG_0513.jpg Practical life skill activity: dust pan use to clean up acorns.

This wood tray is from Target

IMG_0523.jpg We threaded oak leaves (oak trees make acorns!) in to our stick loom for a fun fall-themed nature study + fine motor skill handcraft activity. We’ve been using our stick looms a lot lately so it was fun to loosely connect it to Henny Penny on the day we read it 🙂

THE LITTLE RED HEN

IMG_0735.jpg Storytelling for The Little Red Hen.

We read through the story together one time with no aids. Then, the second time through I brought all the storytelling aids out: hen, catdog, & mouse, and then a divided tray with wheat seeds (it’s actually pearled barley), wheat plant (a grass plume from our yard), flour, and bread.

The other book pictured is is Alain Gree’s book The Farm which has this awesome page called “The story of bread” that helps reinforce the story of the little red hen making cake from wheat seeds.

We also love listening to and singing along with Heather Forest’s version of this tale (from Sing Me Story).

IMG_0733.jpg Sensory play and scooping & pouring. After baking bread (see below) the kids just played with all the wheat seeds, plants, flour, bread, and bread dough. The kitchen floor was an insane mess when it was over, but they were so engaged and loving it. They were scooping and pouring and smashing to their hearts’ content all morning.
IMG_0734.jpg Wheat learning: wheat seeds (it’s actually pearled barley), wheat plant (a grass plume from our yard), flour, and bread.

I gave my son a tray of the wheat seeds to practice forming the letter H. I love love love our tray for sensory letter writing — it’s deep so it doesn’t spill out easily and small so they form the letters in a reasonable size.

Book pictured: Food Anatomy (the bread pages in this book were also super fun to look at!)

IMG_0737.jpg The kids made their own bread!!

I use the master recipe from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes A Day — it’s literally impossible to get bad bread even if you have zero baking skills! It’s SO EASY. It’s a no-knead dough with only 4 ingredients and take two seconds to prep. The kids can mash the dough and form it in to ANY SHAPE and it will bake perfect and delicious.

IMG_0759.jpg For poetry tea time on this Little Red Hen day, we read two fun hen poems: “The Little Black Hen” from Now We Are Six and “The Clucking Hen” from A Child’s Book of Poems. And, we had some snacks-that-come-from wheat!

THE THREE LITTLE PIGS

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The Three Little Pigs is a perfect H is for House story! We read that book and How A House is Built by Gail Gibbons, and then I set up an invitation to build houses out of straw, sticks, and brick.

This also served as an invitation to retell the story as we went house by house and huffed and puffed to blow the houses down!

Supplies:

  • Three pigs & a wolf
  • Bricks: red stacking block pieces + red play dough
  • Sticks (stack them like Lincoln logs — I didn’t want to use actual Lincoln logs because I thought that would be too hard to blow down!)
  • Straw: I just cut up some ornamental grass plumes from our yard
IMG_0679.jpg Blow pigs off the table with a straw (we used pigs from our Pass the Pigs game since they are little and light)

Blowing through a straw helps strengthen the mouth muscles needed for proper speech. Plus, it’s fun!

IMG_0804.jpg Form the letter H using sticks & bricks! H is definitely easier than G 🙂
Letter Unit Activities

Letter B Preschool Unit

OVERVIEW

We spent 3 weeks on Letter B. We first did one week of B is for Bee and B is for Butterfly because it fit nicely with some field trips and seasonal learning. Then, we spend a week on The Peaceful Preschool Letter B activities for Blueberries for Sal (with some additions). For the third week, we did B is for Bird. Below you’ll find a variety of learning activities.

B IS FOR BIRD

8FBC01B7-C24F-4C29-B05C-3EAB21720CF4 COMING SOON! I’m writing a separate post for our B is for Bird activities since there was a lot.

BIBLE FOCUS

IMG_1296 B is for John the Baptist and Baptism. This also fit nicely in to our B is for Bee theme!

See our Bible Stories A-Z post for more details.

THE PEACEFUL PRESCHOOL ACTIVITIES

Book

That’s it! We loved this book so much that we just read it again and again. I had other B is for Bear books on our shelf to enjoy but mainly we focused on Blueberries for Sal! It’s a classic for a reason.

Learning Activities

The following activities were spread over 3 days.

IMG_2307.jpg Letter B basket of items — We spent time learning about things that start with the letter B (and reviewed the letter B sound), and then we matched various items-that-start-with-B to our Letter B 3-Part Cards via Treehouse Schoolhouse.

Books:

IMG_2234.jpg Retelling Blueberries for Sal 

Using props to retell a story helps add in some fun to the learning but also helps with building language and storytelling recall (characters, settings, sequences, and key events).

We counted out fresh blueberries (using our number cards from The Peaceful Preschool) in to mini buckets. Kerplink, kerplank, kerplunk!

IMG_2305.jpg We painted a letter B with blueberry juice crushed from real berries.

I had my kids smash blueberries with a mortar & pestle and then help strain the juice into a bucket. They then painted a B with the juice.

IMG_2233.jpg We picked strawberries from our garden! We did not have a convenient place to pick blueberries this week, but we had so many strawberries in our own garden so it worked out fine!
IMG_2230.jpg Berry sorting activity.

Sort, name, and count the berries: strawberry, blueberry, raspberry, blackberry.

Book: Food Anatomy

IMG_2228.jpg Make berry smoothies. The kids helped measure everything out.

Our recipe:

  • 2 cups mixed fresh berries
  • 1 frozen banana
  • 2/3 cup Greek yogurt
  • 1 cup packed spinach
  • cold water as needed
IMG_2084.jpg Blue buttons, blue beads, and blue balls fine motor skills sorting activity (from a blue basket in to bowls).

I’ve since learned that my son kind of rejects activities like this; my daughter (2) will go for it though.

IMG_2405.jpg Forming a B with play dough and adding blue marbles & beads to look like blueberries.
IMG_2351.jpg Straining and counting activity: throw a bunch of blueberries in to a bowl of water. Strain the blueberries out using a handy scooper tool and count in to a numbered muffin tin.
IMG_1798.jpg Blow bubbles. FUN, but also strengthens mouth muscles necessary for proper speech.

This is at the spillway off the dam where we live. That’s our dog swimming 🙂

IMG_1578.jpg Zoo Letter B scavenger hunt! I made up a scavenger hunt for our zoo trip with things I thought we would see.
IMG_2437.jpg I also built in some time for review with a Letter A and Letter B sorting activity.

This tray is from Target and the mini bowls are IKEA.

B IS FOR BEE

Books
Learning Activities
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Local Honey Farm Visit

We actually did this first because the Monday of this week was a holiday and my husband could join us for the field trip. We saw a live hive and watched the bees for awhile, sampled a variety of local honey, talked to beekeepers, and saw a variety of bee-related products. We purchased a few items to take home and enjoy.

IMG_1361.jpg Anatomy of a Bee using natural materials. We have done this anatomy-of-a-bug activity for ants, bees, and butterflies. It works SO GREAT for insects and includes natural counting.

Book: Nature Anatomy

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Bee hive counting cards activities.

You can download the hive counting cards for free here. I printed my on to yellow card stock.

This involves numeral-to-quantity correlation.

We used honeycomb, rocks with painted bees on them (or you could use mini bee erasers or plastic bees), and a bee stamp.

FYI: I paint rocks with Uni-posca medium and fine paint pens.

IMG_1411.jpg Fine motor skill threading activity: honeycomb cereal on to a lacing string.
IMG_1307.jpg Invitation to play:

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Fine motor skill transfer activity: transfer pollen to the hive.

Using a camping mat and yellow pom poms and our squeezy tweezers.

My other option with this was to use an egg carton.

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Honey hive transfer activity + science fun!

I put yellow-dyed vinegar in an empty honey bottle as well as provided some in a bowl with an eyedropper.

The egg cartons are filled with baking soda.

Transfer & enjoy the explosion!

IMG_1527.jpg Read BEE, form the letter B with rock bees, and spell out the word BEE with our moveable alphabet.
IMG_1550.jpg Scissor skills: cut floral straws for the bee to eat.

B IS FOR BUTTERFLY

Books
Learning Activities
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Witness a caterpillar turning in to a butterfly! We were lucky to collect a monarch caterpillar in time for our B is for Butterfly study and to eventually watch it emerge from the chrysalis! If you can’t see this in person, there are amazing time lapse videos online to watch with your kids.
IMG_1716.jpg Form a floral B for the butterflies to eat. Pairing bees and butterflies together fit nicely to intuitively learn about pollinators.

Whenever we glue items on to a large letter like this, I have the kids spread the glue with a Q-tip to help learn the form of the letter.

IMG_1872.jpg Anatomy of a Butterfly using natural materials!

Book: Nature Anatomy

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Butterfly Symmetry puzzle: free printable here.

Print the butterflies on to white card stock, laminate, cut out each butterfly, and then cut in half. I glued the left half of the butterfly to a yellow card stock paper. Then I used velcro dots for the right side of the butterfly so they could be attached in place.

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Life cycle of a butterfly + color sorting activity.

Supplies:

  • Color sorting tray (I made ours)
  • Egg: pom poms
  • Caterpillar: cut up pipe cleaners
  • Chrysalis: painted rigatoni noodles (so the caterpillar can fit inside)
  • Butterflies: rocks with colored butterflies

FYI: I paint rocks with Uni-posca medium and fine paint pens.

IMG_1931.jpg Butterfly symmetry art using a printout from Simply Learning (Letter B Preschool Unit post). We placed paint drops in the middle near the fold, then folded the paper in half and the kids pushed the paint in the direction of the wings. Unfold… and voila!
IMG_1576.jpg Fine motor skills & counting butterfly activity.

Hole punch the correct number of holes on to each wing.

LYTT8458.jpg We were able to visit a botanical garden for our field trip and see a huge variety of butterflies and many still in the chrysalis!
Letter Unit Activities · Uncategorized

Letter A Preschool Unit

OVERVIEW

We spent 4 days of school in one week on A is for Apple in May, using The Peaceful Preschool as a guide (you can download the Letter A Unit for FREE here). Then, for the second week of our Letter A Unit I did 2 days of A is for Ant and 2 days of A is for Acorn.

For the record: if I made a weekly plan today for a Letter A Unit, I would do half this stuff (or less). I do not regret doing this much because I had to try and I had to learn in my own way what too much was for our family. I’m sharing everything we did below, but just know that I think this was too much for a 2 week time frame!

BIBLE FOCUS

IMG_0198 We focused on the story of Adam & Eve: that God created us and takes care of us. You can read more about our Bible Story by Letter Unit here.

A IS FOR APPLE

BOOKS

*Books for The Peaceful Preschool curriculum

PRESCHOOL ACTIVITIES

  • Phonics
  • Counting
  • Fine Motor Skills
  • Practical Life Skills
  • Art Skills
IMG_9848.jpg Phonics

Sandpaper Letter A: I demonstrate how to form letter A with the card then ask my son to repeat

Letter A item basket: name the items and make the letter sounds. We also did the Jolly Phonics letter A sound action. We also play “I Spy” where I describe one item at a time and the kids have to guess what it is.

Glitter glue letter A, via The Peaceful Preschool

IMG_0086.jpg The Peaceful Preschool crafts

Glue wheat berries on to a large letter A printout. I have my kids spread glue with a Q-tip on to the letter, asking them to hold the Q-tip in the pencil grip.

Glue cut colored squares on to the provided apple printout. We used squares cut from paint sample sheets.

IMG_9801.jpg Wash & dry 10 apples for some practical life skills.
IMG_0087.jpg Cut open a couple of apples, sort & name each part: peel, core, seed, flesh. Talk about how apple trees grow from tiny seeds.

Have a snack 🙂

This was a nice activity to not rush through.

IMG_0199.jpg Sort, name & count apple varieties. I bought 5 different varieties so they could make pairs. We laughed a lot about silly apple names and made up a few of our own.

Book: Farm Anatomy (Apple Varieties, page 103)

The book Apples also has a great apple varieties spread.

IMG_0187.jpg Make homemade apple-themed play dough: red, green, and yellow.

I always have my kids help make play dough — they love helping and they love the anticipation of enjoying a new WARM batch of play dough!

IMG_0345.jpg Art skills: make apple trees with play dough and natural materials.

Stamp play dough with the letter A.

Pretend to harvest apples.

IMG_0343.jpg Read and reenact Ten Apples Up On Top!

We stacked & counted cut wood discs that I made, but you could also use blocks! Great for combining storytelling, fine motor skills, and counting skills.

IMG_0238.jpg Chop apples for apple pie (using our nylon knife)
IMG_0334.jpg Bake apple pie or apple crisp together. Have a tea party and read a favorite story to enjoy.
IMG_0335.jpg While baking apple pie I provided a flour and brown sugar tray to practice letter A formation.

This is the tray we have (and love). Sandpaper letters are here. Glitter glue A is via The Peaceful Preschool

IMG_0344.jpg Pretend play Farmer’s Market after reading Apple Farmer Annie with: apples, apple pie, apple juice, applesauce, apple butter, and dried apples.

Take turns being the apple farmer and have the others pay with pretend money (with very simple counting: “one apple will be 3 coins”)

This tray is from Target.

IMG_9849.jpg Mini apple fine motor skills & sorting activity.

Use: red, green, and yellow pom poms, tweezers, and a sorting tray.

This is an activity that I first demonstrate, then have my kids take turns, and then leave on our learning shelves for them to revisit later.

IMG_0088.jpg Sensory bin after reading How to Make An Apple Pie and See the World.

Oats, brown sugar, flower, wheat berries, cinnamon, and frozen cranberries (“apples”).

Practice scooping and pouring and just PLAY.

IMG_0186.jpg Letter A 3-Part Card learning activity.

Letter A 3-Part Cards via Treehouse Schoolhouse.

I slip the whole card into our Learning Resources Tabletop Pocket Chart. Then, I provide the picture cards in one basket and place the word cards on the table. My son then matches the word cards to the picture cards using the Tabletop Pocket Chart set as a guide.

IMG_9916.jpg Fine motor skill threading & counting activity: frozen cranberries on to an “apple tree” (sticks stuck in play dough).

I had to punch a hole in some of the frozen berries to help out, but this was a huge hit. Why? Because they made an utter mess!!! They eventually took the sticks out and smashed cranberries all over the table. Awesome.

IMG_0180.jpg Letter A formation out of play dough. I slipped The Peaceful Preschool printout in our write-and-wipe pouches.

Simply Learning apple basket counting activity (free printable here).

Book: Apple Farmer Annie

OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

  • Large Motor Skills
  • Nature Study
IMG_9841.jpg Find fruit trees or visit an orchard.
IMG_9850.jpg We explored some fruit we found from our fruit trees on property: peaches, apples, and cherries.

Book: The Apple Pie Tree

IMG_9920.jpg Interactive play with Ten Apples Up On Top!: scatter balls around and have your child run and collect them back in to a bin.
IMG_0078.jpg Ladder climbing to pretend to pick apples. My kids each took an apple with them and then threw them down to me!

A IS FOR ACORN

BOOKS

SONG

5 Little Acorns

(Five) little acorns swaying in a tree,
Hanging from a branch as high as can be.
Along came a squirrel and took one away.
(Four) little acorns are left to sway.

(Four) little acorns swaying in a tree…
(Three) little acorns swaying in a tree…
(Two) little acorns swaying in a tree…
(One) little acorn swaying in a tree…

ACTIVITIES

IMG_0883.jpg Form Letter A with acorn caps.
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Sensory bin & play:

Planting acorns to make oak trees!

Complete with a squirrel.

IMG_0853.jpg Lacing activity: thread oak leaves.

I used embroidery thread and a plastic yarn needle. This was the first time I did something like this with my kids and it surprised me how great at it they were and how much fun they had making little leaf necklaces.

IMG_0859.jpg Nature study: compare oak leaves to two other kinds of leaves.

We also identified trees in our yard, not expecting my son to be able to correctly ID them but just for him to hear the names of different trees and see that we are interested and witness what features we look at to ID.

Book: My Leaf Book

Moveable alphabet: my own DIY.

IMG_0912.jpg We went outside and went on an oak leaf hunt. The best kind of nature learning happens in real life, not from a picture book!
IMG_0913.jpg Process art: paint with acorns
IMG_0921.jpg Oak leaf rubbings — crayon and paper. I taped the leaves to the back of the paper to make it easier.
IMG_0955.jpg Hide 3-Part cards in a bin of acorns; find a card and match it to the cards on the table.
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Fine motor skills & play: make woodland peg dolls with acorn hats. This took a little while to find the right size match for each doll but they had so much fun doing it!

A IS FOR ANT

BOOKS

ACTIVITIES

IMG_0525.jpg Sing “The Ants Go Marching” and add in some storytelling (and counting) fun.

I collected some small creek rocks and painted ants on them using a fine tip paint pen. As we sang “The Ants Go Marching”, I flipped over our corresponding number cards (via The Peaceful PreschooL) and had my son add an additional ant to our little line.

IMG_0515.jpg Sorting and counting ant rocks.

I set our numbered muffin tin in a “dirt bin” (black beans, pinto beans, brown rice) and my son used our Learning Resources handy scoopers to get the ant rocks out of the dirt and count in to the tin. Involves number + quantity connection as well as fine motor skills.

IMG_0486.jpg Ants in dirt sensory play.

I made our own ant rocks but you could also get small plastic ones.

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Anatomy of an ant using rocks and sticks.

This was so great for simple counting + insect nature study. We’ve studied a lot of insects up close since doing this activity and my son always thinks about the number of legs and antennae.

Book: Nature Anatomy (pages 94-95)

IMG_0631.jpg Letter A salt tray formation with raisin “ants”
IMG_0599.jpg Practical life: spreading peanut butter for making “ants on a log” snacks
IMG_0373.jpg Life cycle of an ant

I made these little pieces with rocks and sticks and thread (wrapped around), and little white pom poms for the eggs. The lifecycle printable is available via The Pinay Homeschooler.

Book: Are You An Ant?

IMG_0632.jpg Ant hunt!

Simply spread honey on a piece of paper (in this case my son spread honey with a Q-tip on to a letter A printout) and set it out to attract some insects. We used our magnifying glass to investigate closely.

IMG_0426.jpg Practical life skills: thoroughly clean the kitchen to keep ants away! We love this little dustpan.
IMG_0685.jpg Studying ants up close at our local children’s museum. THIS is actually why I chose to even do A is for Ant in the first place.
Letter Unit Activities · Uncategorized

Bible Lessons by Letter Unit

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*NOTE: I will update this page as we move from letter to letter. You can find this post under the menu navigation under “Preschool”

“The Word of God is like fertile seed you drop into the soil. The child does not take in everything that is there. He thinks about some aspect of it. ‘And idea strikes him,’ or he ‘feels’ (knowledge touched with emotion). He thinks. He ‘chews on some part of it.’ And that is that. Charlotte Mason warns us against exhausting the child with endless nagging exhortations to ‘be good.’ … The reality of the life lived keeps coming in, as well as giving the child direct access to the Word.” (Susan Schaeffer Macaulay, “For the Children’s Sake“)

I knew before starting preschool at home I wanted to incorporate storytelling from the Bible & prayer into our daily rhythm. Since I’m already making weekly plans based on Letter Units, I decided to base weekly Bible themes to (sort of) fit in with each letter of the alphabet. I choose not to follow any specific Bible curriculum because at this point that seems overwhelming to me. I may incorporate something more official once we move in to kindergarten.

I usually pick one specific theme or story (sometimes this actually comes directly from The Peaceful Preschool curriculum) and (maybe) one planned activity. Mostly I just want to pray together and to read stories from The Jesus Storybook Bible and talk about it throughout our week. Lately I’ve found that reading a Bible story on a non-school day seems to work best for our daily rhythm.

We also do a hymn following the Ambleside Online hymn schedule.

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I keep a “Bible Bin” with our school stuff of the following items for our weekly Bible focus:

Okay, so here are our themes and corresponding stories from The Jesus Storybook Bible by letter:

Letter A Unit: Adam & Eve

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: “The beginning: a perfect home” (26-27) and “The terrible lie” (28-37)

Themes: God created me, God created everything, and God takes care our needs.

TPP Memory Verse: “A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in pictures of silver.” (Proverbs 25:11)

Songs: “Doxology” and “The Lord is Good to Me”

Letter B Unit: John the Baptist

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: “Heaven breaks through” (200-207)

Themes: Baptism, blessing, need for the Holy Spirit

TPP Memory Verse: “Be kind to one another.” (Ephesians 4:32)

Letter C Unit: Children

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: “The friend of little children” (256-263)

Themes: God is our Father, Jesus’s love for children

TPP Memory Verse: “Hear, ye children, the instruction of a father, and attend to know understanding.” (Proverbs 4:1)

Letter D Unit: Do Unto Others… (The Golden Rule)

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: The Servant King (286-293)

Themes: The Golden Rule, our need for Jesus to help us be kind & love

Activity: This idea came directly out of The Peaceful Preschool with some additions of my own. I added the story A Hat for Mrs. Goldman because it beautifully illustrates The Golden Rule and we made golden pom poms (inspired by the story) and wrote out 10 good deeds on golden hearts.

TPP Memory Verse: “Do everything without complaining or arguing.” (Philippians 2:4)

Letter E Unit: Earth (7 Days of Creation)

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: “The beginning: a perfect home” (18-27)

Themes: The earth is the Lord’s, God made everything

Activity: We made the seven days of creation out of play dough. The Creation Story Cards can be found for free here (I printed them on blue card stock)

TPP Memory Verse: “The Lord reigns, let the earth rejoice.” (Psalm 97:1)

Song: “All Creatures of Our God and King”

Letter F Unit: Fisherman Friends

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: Let’s go! (208-213)

Stories from other Bibles: A Wish for Fish (The Rhyme Bible)

Themes: Friendship with Jesus, God gives us friends, how does God want us to treat friends

Activity: We went fishing!

TPP Memory Verse: “Or if he ask a fish, will he give him a serpent?” (Matthew 7:10)

Letter G Unit: God’s Goodness

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: God to the rescue! (84-91) / God makes a way (92-99) / Ten Ways to be perfect (100-107)

Stories from other Bibles: Baby in a Boat and God Helps Us (The Rhyme Bible), Got Makes a Road in the Water (The Bible in Pictures for Toddlers)

Themes: God takes care of us, God took care of baby Moses, God took care of the Israelites

Activity: Make a little boat for baby Moses out of tin foil, place a toy baby in it and float it in water. My son also did some coloring book pages of Moses at church.

TPP Memory Verse: “Good and upright is the Lord.” (Psalm 25:8)

Letter H Unit: Healing & Help

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: A little girl and a poor frail lady (214-221)

Other stories: Jesus Makes a Sick Man Well (The Bible in Pictures for Toddlers), The Happy Dad (The Rhyme Bible)

Themes: Our help comes from God; he is our rest and our rescue

Activity: Act out the stories with peg dolls (build a house for the story where the paralytic man’s friends lower him down through a roof. I also LOVE the Bible for Kids app for these stories.

TPP Memory Verse: “Unless the Lord builds the house, they labor in vain that build it.” (Psalm 127:1)

Letter I Unit: Noah (“…INTO the ark…”)

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: A new beginning (38-47)

Other stories: “God Takes Care of Noah” and “God Does What He Says He Will Do” (The Bible in Pictures for Toddlers), The Floating Zoo (The Rhyme Bible)

Themes: God’s promises, hope in God who takes care of us

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Activities:

  1. Act out the story with peg dolls and animals
  2. Make a shaving cream rain cloud (jar of water topped with some shaving cream & then drop blue food coloring drops and wait for them to saturate the “cloud” and fall)
  3. Draw rainbows (we used Kwik Stix) — for reference we used the rainbows page from Nature Anatomy
  4. Work on our Hape George Luck Noah’s Ark puzzle.

TPP Memory Verse: “The Lord said to Noah, ‘Come thou and all thy house into the ark.'” (Genesis 7:1)

Letter J Unit: Joy (Fruit of the Spirit)

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: Running away (272-279)

Other stories: “Jesus Tells People How to Please God” and “A Man Hunts for His Lost Sheep” (The Bible in Pictures for Toddlers), The Lost Lamb (The Rhyme Bible)

Themes: What makes God joyful? Where does our joy come from? Comparison of sweetness of fruit to sweetness of love, joy, peace.

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Activity: Make jars of Fruit of the Spirit Jam. The kids first painted some “jam” into jars (a free printable linked below). Later, we talked about the 9 fruit of the spirit and they colored individual cards for each fruit. We compared joy and love and patience, etc. to sweetness since fruit is sweet. The kids then each glued the little Fruit of the Spirit cards on to jars of jam. I laminated them, punched a hole in the corner, then added them to a book ring. For awhile I have kept the cards on the kitchen table and we reviewed the Fruit of the Spirit every day at lunch time since making the cards.

TPP Memory Verse: “The fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace…” (Galatians 5:22)

Letter K Unit: King & Kingdom

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: The King of all Kings (192-199), The Servant King (286-293), plus the Lord’s Prayer version on pages 226-227

Other stories: “Wise Men Look for Baby Jesus”, “Wise Men Take Presents to Jesus” (The Bible in Pictures for Toddlers), “Who Saw Jesus?” (The Rhyme Bible)

Themes: Jesus is King. The Lord’s Prayer: Thy Kingdom Come.

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Activities:

  • Reenact the Nativity story.
  • Read fairytales and play pretend to be Kings and Queens
  • Work on memorizing The Lord’s Prayer with these printable prayer cue cards I made, laminated, then added to a book ring.

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TPP Memory Verse: “Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done.” (Matthew 6:10)

Letter L Unit: Light & Love

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: The Light of the Whole World (184-191)

Other stories: “Wise Men Look for Baby Jesus” (The Bible in Pictures for Toddlers), 1 Corinthians 13

Themes: Light. Jesus as the Light of the World. Love. Loving our Neighbors.

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Activities:

  • We learned some simple hand motions to the song Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star
  • Reenacted the Nativity story
  • Reviewed The Golden Rule and good deeds for neighbors
  • Leaf rubbing hearts

TPP Memory Verse: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself” (Matthew 22:39

Letter M Unit: Mary (Mother), Manger, Magi

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: The Light of the Whole World (184-191) and The King of all Kings (192-199)

Other stories: Are You My Mother? and the page about mother hens from Thoughts To Make Your Heart Sing

Themes: Mary & Mothers — Mangers and care of babies. Magi & Money (gift-giving and the value of gifts).

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Activities:

  • We made a manger M out of pine needles and paired mothers and babies.
  • Learned the song & motions for Away in a Manger
  • We counted out money and talked about the value of money. We also made a donation for Christmas and talked about the value of that gift.

TPP Memory Verse: “The lips of the righteous feed many.” (Proverbs 10:21)

 Letter N Unit: Night and Nativity

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: The Light of the Whole World (184-191) and The King of all Kings (192-199)

Other stories: A Baby Born in Bethlehem

Themes: Night (star of Bethlehem), Nativity

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Activities:

  • We made a Letter N with stars in the sky
  • We sang O Holy Night, Away in a Manger, and The First Noel
  • We wrapped the Star of Bethlehem in yarn (fine motor skills)
  • We paired our Nativity peg doll set with cards I made from The Jesus Storybook bible

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TPP Memory Verse: “Behold, I make all things new.” (Revelation 21:5)

Letter O Unit: Open Eyes

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: A New Way to See (334-341)

Themes: Open eyes, faith as seeing

Activities:

  • No specific craft or activity other than a simple story interaction: I blindfolded the kids and we tested what that felt like, played around with giving and receiving instructions while not being able to see.

TPP Memory Verse: “O taste and see that the Lord is good.” (Psalm 34:8)

Letter P Unit: Prayer

This letter unit fell close to Christmas for us so I chose not to do a separate lesson. Originally I had planned to do P is for Prayer here, and use the story “How to Pray” from The Jesus Storybook Bible.

Letter Q Unit: Quiet

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: The Captain of the Storm (236-243)

Themes: Jesus has power to quiet storms, Jesus comforts us, trusting Jesus

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Activities:

  • We built little cork boats with wine corks + rubber bands + Qtips & felt sails. The kids brought their boats in to the bath tub and we made a storm by turning of the lights and banging the tub for thunder and I turned a flashlight on and off for lightning. We’d take turns saying “QUIET” and calmed the storm.

TPP Memory Verse: “In quietness and trust will be your strength.” (Isaiah 30:15)

Letter R Unit: Resurrection

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: God’s Wonderful Surprise (310-317)

Themes: Resurrection, new life, defeating death, heaven

Activities:

  • We used our Jesus Storybook Bible peg dolls to reenact the story. The kids selected this train track tunnel we have to be the tomb and we used a rock to cover it.

TPP Memory Verse: “If ye then be risen with Christ, seek those things which are above.” (Colossians 3:1)

 Letter S Unit: Shepherds

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: The Good Shepherd (130-135)

Other Stories Used: Psalm 23 by Barry Moser, “A Man Hunts for His Lost Sheep” (The Bible in Pictures for Toddlers), “The Lost Lamb” (The Rhyme Bible)

Themes: Shepherd loving the lost sheep, The Lord is Our Shepherd

Activities:

  • We used our 100 Number Chart to count out 100 sheep with mini marshmallows, re-reading the story and talking about how God cares about one single lost sheep in the midst of so many, just like He loves us.

TPP Memory Verse: “For by grace ye have been saved.” (Ephesians 2:8)

Letter T Unit: Treasure

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: Treasure Hunt! (250-255)

Themes: Treasure (things of great value)

Activities:

  • We used a little treasure box filled with rocks and took turns hiding it around the house to give the others a turn for a treasure hunt.

TPP Memory Verse: “Teach me to do your will.” (Psalm 143:8)

Letter U Unit: Unity

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: The Forgiving Prince (76-83)

Other Stories Used: “Joseph Forgives His Brothers”  (The Bible in Pictures for Toddlers)

Themes: Unity, forgiveness, loving our siblings

Activities:

  • No activities — we just read the story & discussed it.

TPP Memory Verse: “How good and pleasant it is for brothers to dwell together in unity.” (Psalm 133:1)

Letter V Unit: Victory

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: The Young Hero and the Horrible Giant (122-129)

Other Stories Used: “David Isn’t Afraid”  (The Bible in Pictures for Toddlers)

Themes: God is our victory & we do not have to be afraid when we are connected to him (see also memory verse: vine & branches); The battle is God’s and God always wins His battles

Activities:

  • No activities — we just read the story & discussed it.

TPP Memory Verse: “I am the vine, you are the branches.” (John 15:5)

Letter W Unit: Waiting

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: God Sends Help (326-332)

Other Stories Used: “The Spirit Arrives on Pentecost” (134) and “The Holy Spirit: God’s Best Gift” (137-138) from (The Ology)

Themes: Waiting on the Holy Spirit to come (at Pentecost) after Jesus went to heaven. The Holy Spirit lives in us now as we wait for Jesus’s return. The Holy Spirit is like a fire in us.

Activities:

  • Fire art piece. The kids cut up tiny pieces of red, orange, and yellow construction paper and then individually glued these pieces on to a pre-cut fire shape. We then glue that on to a black page for the background.

TPP Memory Verse: “They that wait on the Lord, renew their strength.” (Isaiah 40:31)

Letter X Unit: The Cross

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: The Sun Stops Shining (302-309)

Other Stories Used: The Garden, The Curtain, and The Cross

Themes: What did Jesus accomplish on the Cross? and we also talked about the emotions of Jesus dying on the cross (for God, Jesus, Jesus’ followers, and us)

Activities: Watercolor and popsicle stick art piece of the cross. We used the page from The Jesus Storybook Bible as inspiration.

TPP Memory Verse: “Herein do I exercise myself, to always have a conscience void of offense.” (Acts 24:16)

Letter Y Unit: Yeast 

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: Filled full! (244-249)

Other Stories Used: Food Anatomy (to talk about bread and fermentation)

Themes: Yeast turns to bread; we talked about God making something out of nothing (the Fishes & Loaves story)

Activities: Make bread together. We also did this yeast experiment.

TPP Memory Verse: “My yoke is easy and my burden is light.” (Matthew 11:30)

Letter Z Unit: Zacchaeus’ Zeal 

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The Jesus Storybook Bible: The Man Who Didn’t Have Any Friends (None) (264-271)

Other Resources: Z is for Zeal from Tiny Theologians (ABCs Attributes of God)

Themes: Zacchaeus’ story of transformation, and what Zeal means

Activities: None. Just read the story and discussed! We talked about climbing trees as well 🙂

TPP Memory Verse: “It is good to be zealously affected always in a good thing.” (Galatians 4:18)

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